Tag Archives: Thanksgiving

A Ladies’ Thanksgiving ~ ab fab

 

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L to R: Moi w/Sophie the Wonder Dog, Charlotte Woods Innes, Lynn Woods Rix who writes as Dalyn Woods

 

Friendship is so important at any age but is extremely important for the over-50 crowd. I found myself alone in Florida after my husband passed away, but not-to-worry, I was swept up by a group of Christian ladies who like to get out and get going.

I enjoyed Thanksgiving dinner with three of these gals. We gathered at my dear friend Deborah William’s house. I arrived early to help Deborah cook the turkey, her first time cooking one.

Each lady brought one or more traditional dishes. I wish I had a photo from last night of Deborah, but I do have one of Lynn Woods Rix and her sister Charlotte Woods Innes. We’re standing in front of one of Deborah’s three beautifully decorated Christmas trees.


Giving Thanks ~ makes me feel good

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So, first of all, I want to thank all my blog readers and my fiction readers. You make me feel good.

If there’s a secret sauce in my life, it would be stop analyzing and just give thanks. That’s it.

Why did that thing happen? Why did those people act that way to me? Why didn’t they appreciate me? Why couldn’t they see what they were doing was so destructive to themselves and others? I could, and I have spent weeks, no months analyzing issues such as these. At the end of that time, I’ve come up with some pretty plausible answers. Were any of them, the right answer? Maybe, maybe not. Hard to know, but they were plausible answers to those questions. Did all that analyzing solve any dilemmas? No, not really.

When I first started trying to find things to intentionally be thankful for, it felt weird, like an exercise. But once I kept at it, thanksgiving started to change things inside me. First of all, I realized the act of giving thanks is energizing. Thanksgiving is powerful.

In my life, the one I thank the most is God. I’ve been doing this long enough now that it’s actually fun to watch God move. I thank Him for what he’s doing in my life.

1 Chronicles 16:34 ~ Oh give thanks to the Lord, for he is good;
    for his steadfast love endures forever! ~ [ESV]

This is going to date me. I think Captain Kangaroo was right. Thank you is a magic word. Most people should use it more often. I should use it more often. I should say the words ‘thank you’ aloud to other people more often. Saying ‘thank you’ makes others feel good. When the people around us feel good, life is a whole lot easier for everybody. When there’s a general feeling of appreciation, there’s a lot less stress.

This thankfulness thing is really pretty simple. it’s so simple it works.


The Mystery of an Upstate NY Thanksgiving

I spent Thanksgiving with my brother Michael and his wife Laura. As I drove north from Brooklyn with my sweet little dog Sophie, we were encountering increasingly stormy weather. I was driving into a snowy nor’easter.

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When Michael, Laura, and I arrived at my brother’s in laws, it was a frozen winter wonderland. This is a photo of Laura’s daughter’s front yard.

 

 

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The power was out due to the storm, so they had to go down the road to folks who had power and borrow their generator to cook the turkey. By the time we got there the power had been restored, thankfully.

 

 

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My brother Michael and little Sophie and what I was nearly sure had to be the Hound of the Baskervilles. Would you believe, this dog is still a puppy?

 

 

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Moi with the pup. This dog is licking-liscious. He loves giving kisses.

 

 

 

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Brother and sister-in-law Laura with Kagan the ChiChi and my little Sophie. And there’s the big pup sticking his nose in. He had to be absolutely everywhere.

 

 

 

 

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This is the village Michael and I grew up in.

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1368IMG_1369This is the village “walking path.” It might not be visible, but to the extreme left in the second photo is a bench. When we were kids there was no bench. About a mile back this lane leads to a creek where we used to swim. The lane was much more rugged then and on either side of the trees were cow pastures.

IMG_1370Don’t know why, but it seems wherever I go with my trusty camera, I attract a police presence. The village cop wanted to see who was walking around back there so bright and early the morning after Thanksgiving. He saw me taking pictures and gave me a wave.


Thanksgiving 99cents sale: HARMFUL INTENT

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Thanksgiving is a warm and cozy holiday. It’s truly a wonderful American holiday, such a great time for family and friends get together.

It’s also a fantastic time to curl up with a cup of steaming tea, coffee, or hot cocoa and start in reading a murder mystery. I don’t know why, but to me, autumn seems to lend itself to reading crime fiction. I can see myself sitting by a roaring fire or listening to the wind blow outside as I turn pages.

So, I’m going to make it easy for readers to enjoy my newest murder mystery release, HARMFUL INTENT. I’m reducing the price to 99 cents for Thanksgiving.

HARMFUL INTENT

Sweet, askance romance, warm intimacy, sophisticated themes presented tastefully. Tons of humor. Really, it’s a scream!

Betrayal runs in private investigator Veronica “Ronnie” Ingels’ family. So, why is she surprised when her husband of one year cheats on her? The real shock is his murder, with the local lawman pegging her as the prime suspect.

Ronnie Ingels is a Brooklyn bred private investigator who travels to west Texas, where her cheating husband is murdered. As she hunts the killer to clear her name, she becomes the hunted.

Deputy Sergeant Dawson Hughes, a former Army Ranger, is a man folks want on their side. Only he’s not so sure at first, he’s on the meddling New York PI’s side. As the evidence points away from her, he realizes the more she butts in, the more danger she attracts to herself.

Raves for HARMFUL INTENT:

Who’d a thunk it? Nike Chillemi’s New York gusto in Texas. HARMFUL INTENT is a mystery/suspense delight, mixing Nike’s New York flavor, the quirkiness of the South, a mystery to die for, and laugh aloud humor. I couldn’t put it down. ~ Fay Lamb, author of STALKING WILLOW and BETTER THAN REVENGE.

Nike Chillemi delivers another gritty ‘who dun it’ in her signature no nonsense style, with just the right amount of humor to lighten it up on occasion while keeping it real. Tracy Krauss – award winning and bestselling author of numerous novels including WIND OVER MARSHDALE

Echoing the best pulp fiction of generations past, Chillemi’s new contemporary series will please readers of romantic suspense. Harmful Intent introduces a modern day big-city female PI armed to the teeth and ready to draw when faced with danger in Texas. The best of both worlds happen when east coast meets southern charm in the hunt for cold-blooded killers. –Lisa Lickel, author of The Buried Treasure series

 


Thanksgiving Day, a Chance for Citizens to Focus on Important Stuff

I love the Thanksgiving holiday for many reasons. Yes, it beckons to my favorite holiday… Christmas, but that’s not the biggest reason why I love Thanksgiving. As a card carrying foodie, I love making a menu for Thanksgiving dinner. I do that every single year, pull out the holiday cookbooks and decide what I’m going to make to go with the bird.

As I hit the supermarkets, invariably I start thinking about food donations for those less fortunate. Giving seems to go naturally with Thanksgiving. With the holiday’s roots in our religious and cultural past, Thanksgiving asks us to think beyond ourselves. It urges us to engage in acts of kindness.

Often my daughter’s school would collect food at Thanksgiving, but this year her high school didn’t.

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So, I turned to City Harvest and found out the New York Fire Department, the New York Police Department, and many Modells Sporting Goods stores were collecting food.

Off I went to the 321 Engine Hook & Ladder Company on the edge of Marine Park.

 

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Of course, when approaching from the front, I couldn’t figure out how to get in. Then I realized I had to walk down the side alley. At the side door was where a firefighter happily took my bags of non-perishable food items.

Indeed I love the aroma of roasting turkey wafting around the house on Thanksgiving Day, the lingering smell of pumpkin pied just baked. There’s nothing like padding around the next day in PJs and an old pair of sweat socks while eating left over pie for breakfast, heating mashed sweet potatoes in the microwave for lunch and making turkey sandwiches. But the most gratifying thing is knowing how blessed my family is… and it is blessed indeed. There have been challenges, to say the least. But God had also richly blessed us. To my mind the best way to show gratitude is by giving.

For information about City Harvest, call (800) 77-HARVEST or email fooddrives@cityharvest.org.


Squanto: A Special Thanksgiving Gift From God

Native American, SquantoI love Thanksgiving because I get to eat, and then to go back and pick and go back and pick again, and again. LOL

Seriouly…The entire holiday is a “feel good” holiday for me. The family is together and there’s a huge feeling of home ‘n hearth. The cooking smells are soooo nice. And the spirit of thanksgiving just permeates the air. PTL!

However, I’m also a researcher and I’ve come to learn that what we call Thanksgiving Day was begun by an American Indian of the Patuxet tribe named Tisquantum, or as he is better known today, “Squanto.” It began when Squanto took a tradition from the heritage of his native people, that of Potlatch, an Indian covenant ceremony that centered around feasting and giving of precious gifts in honor and covenant.

Tisquantum’s tribe the Patuxet lived in what is now known as Plymouth. In 1605 he was captured and brought to England where he learned English.

Several years later Captain John Smith Brought Squanto back to New England. Shortly after that, he was again captured and brought to Spain as a slave with several other Indians. He and the others were kept in cages and shown off as a type of carnival or circus attraction. Local friars rescued them, taught them to read and write, and introduced them to Christianity. Squanto became well versed in Scripture while there, and also became an expert horseman. He eventually traveled back to England and in 1619 returned back to the New World. It occurs to me that to be able to do all this, especially in that day, he obviously had the hand of the Lord on him.

When Squanto reached his native village, he discovered his entire tribe had been wiped out by a plague. Being the only survivor, he went to live with a neighboring tribe, the Wampanoag. Squanto lived among them as a Christian.

In November 1620, after enduring more than two months of difficult conditions on board the Mayflower and also being blown off course (they had planned to settle just north of the Virginia colony), the Pilgrims landed at Cape Cod. They hastily constructed rude shelters, but they were not prepared for the harsh New England winters and the scarcity of food. By spring, nearly half of them had died from malnutrition and disease.

William Bradford wrote in his book, Of Plymouth Plantation, about the spring of 1621:

“About the 16th of March, a certain Indian came boldly amongst them and spoke to them in broken English…His name was Samoset. He told them also of another Indian whose name was Squanto, a native of this place, who had been in England and could speak better English than himself…About four or five day after, came the aforesaid Squanto.”

Squanto labored with the Pilgrims to plant corn and other crops that fared well in the New England soil and climate. He showed them where were the best places to trap and fish. He helped negotiate a peace treaty between the colony and the surrounding tribes. According to William Bradford, “Squanto…was a special instrument sent of God for their good beyond their expectation.”

The harvest brought enough food for the next winter, and Governor Bradford called for a day of thanksgiving. Chief Massasoit of the Wampanoag and 90 of his men came and stayed for three days of feasting and entertainment.

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“Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor…Now, therefore, I do appoint Thursday, the 26th day of November…that we may all unite to render unto Him our sincere and humble thanks for His kind care and protection.”

It was not until 1863 that President Lincoln set aside the last Thursday of November as the annual national day of thanksgiving.

In 1941, Congress established the fourth Thursday of November as a permanent national Thanksgiving Day holiday.


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